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are harmless, in fact, many are good for us. >> if you're in an environment where it is too clean you could get the next infection that comes along. >> give me a deep breath. >> reporter: the doctor says our super clean life-style could be partly to blame for the rise in the number of people with allergies and asthma. >> i view the immune system as an army, and if it doesn't have anything to fight, in many cases it will fight allergens. >> dogs, cats, trees. >> reporter: she has allergies, as well as three of her friends at school. >> we can't be like a normal kid. >> reporter: recent studies give new weight to the decades-old theory that some germs help our systems, between the harmful and harmless irritants. these findings of this population shows that kids raised on cow farms had reduced risk of allergies. the findings follow a previous study in europe >> there is a link between the farming community having less of a link between the allergies, and the kids having less of them as they grow up. >> reporter: the experts say the alcohol-based sanitizers do have a place in our lives. in hospital
proven that they foster or canned dealing in a diverse environment. that is how i understood their plan. it is not because of race. it is combining that with other factors. >> there is a plus because of race. there are many other factors. the white student president of the class in an ethnically different school is a measure of leadership. leadership is an independent factor. he is not getting that point because of his race. he is getting that point because of his leadership. that is race-neutral criteria that could work for anybody. race is an independent and-on -- add-on. they say they could contextualized. it is not narrowly tailored and it gives mistreatment to asian americans because they are minorities as well. if it depends on the question factor, there is no way to fit with they are doing to the solution of the problem, which may use as a major foundation of their proposal, which is the non-diverse class compared cementum there's no correspondence there. i see my time is up >> we will afford you rebuttal time. mr. garre. >> thank you. for two reasons, it is held under this court
. they are in these environments. some students are insane. if they lay a hand on a student they will get prosecuted and lose their jobs. it's a tough situation to be in. this guy is, he's not 220, he's 240 from that picture there and for him to tell his friends to sit around and say some 6-year-old kid beat me up and bullied me can you imagine that? the key, fred, is that this child had a propensity to act up and fight with administration and other students. the cool knew that and he's saying the school did nothing about that. they allowed the condition to continue and as a result of that he himself got injured. he's not only suing for meds, he's suing for damages. >> avery, the school mr. webster says is complicit so to speak for not having done something to intervene with this kid who has a reputation of being a troublemaker. >> well a troublemaker because he needed medication. they now have him on medication. let me tell you something. i don't think this is a bad case. i think it's bad journalism. what i mean by that "new york post" headline 6-year-old beats up 220-pound gym teach. that's misleading. tha
sleep. ideally, with your light sleep aspect, you want to have a dark environment. dark environment releases the hormone melatonin, which is your sleep hormone. >> that you put over your eyes. >> when it's light out, your body inhibits the release of melatonin. in a quiet environment, you want to make sure that off quiet environment because that interrupts your sleep cycles, too. >> maybe some ear plugs or white noise. >> ear plugs, or white noise. but when you sleep with the tv on, set the alarm so 20 minutes later it turns off. >> an alarm clock, you say? >> ideally you wake up without an alarm clock. if you need it, use it initially. you want good pillow so that you have the proper biomechanics. >> that's a great looking april low. pretty comfortable? >> tempurpedic. >> napping is okay, but don't throw off your sleep schedule. >> get a schedule, high qualltism it's not about doing more, it's about the highest quality sleep possible. >> and take some vacation time. sleep a lot. mark, thank you. nice to see you. >>> from slum to opera singer, a member of mitt romney's much maligned
to the environment. his discoveries are in this magnificent new book, "ice: portraits of vanishing glaciers" and in the feature length documentary "chasing ice," soon to be released. here's an excerpt from its trailer. >>> it all started in iceland. i think i'm so certain to get wet i'll take my boots off. i never imagined that you could see glaciers this big disappearing in such a short time. there's a powerful piece of history that's unfolding in these pictures, and i have to go back. the initial goal was to put out 25 cameras for three years, shoot every hour as long as it was daylight. that would show you how the landscape is changing. oh, this is the way to travel, my friend. >> we're putting really delicate electronics in the harshest conditions on the planet. it's not the nicest environment for technology. >> i do not want to go any lower than this. it's just bottomless. >> i'm going out here on this broken fin and i assume it won't collapse. this is big stuff happening right now. okay, onward. this is the memory of the landscape. that landscape is gone, it may never be seen again in
the droid razr. it's hard to see opportunity in today's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management extra curricular activities help provide a sense of identity and a path to success. joining the soccer team. getting help with math. going to prom. i want to learn to swim. it's hard to feel normal, when you can't do the normal things. to help, sleep train is collecting donations for the extra activities that, for most kids, are a normal part of growing up. not everyone can be a foster parent... but anyone can help a foster child. >>. >> heather: an unmanned privately built spacecraft scheduled for the first launch to the international space station tonight. it's a milestone mission to restore nasa's built to travel back and forth to the space station. nearly two dozen people were arrested during an occupy protest in san francisco. a march turned violent as they allegedly through flar
. this is a very complicated cocktail of biology environment and psychology, and it's not a behavioral choice. >> let me play devil's advocate here and you say nobody chooses to be overweight. >> or anorexic. >> many people say it's the lifestyle choices and the food choices that you make. you are very much in the public spotlight and what are your thoughts on this? >> i definitely think that you absolutely -- i agree with you, doctor, you cannot choose to be obese. you don't choose to be anorexic. it just seems to be people think you probably sit at home and eat tons of food or sit at home and don't eat anything at all and that's a choice, but it's beyond that. >> not just in the news media and let's take chris christie as an example a figure who has been publicly criticized about his figure and weight, and he is very overweight and he knows it and admits it and he addressed this issue time and again, and even discussing it with piers morgan. >> i struggle with my weight. i have been struggling a long time for it and i know it would be better for my kids if i got it more
to beating heart cells. the process done in a petri dish is growth factors that mimics the environment. it is not always a precise science. >> you know, my weekends sometimes would hinge on whether i came in and sold beating cells or not. >> wons they had enough of the beating cells they began watching them as they grew and developed painstakingly extracting their dna and cataloging the genetic changes, a process made possible only by the development of powerful new gene sequencing technology. >> the human genome that was announced cost $3 billion to sequence one individual's dna. and now we can do the same person's dna in a week for $3,000. >> still it took massive networks of computers to organize the data into a color coded genetic blueprint detailing the creation of a heart cell. while having a genetic heart cell macon jury them up, they may be repairing them or heading off birth defects in babies before they are even born. >> we potentially could. part of the attraction to understanding this blueprint, especially this type of blueprint is that it is very aminable -- amenable. >> t
, and environment and psychology. >> no one chooses to be overnight. >> absolutely. or anorexic. >> many people will say, yes, you do. it's the lifestyle choices that you make. and the food choices that you make. emme, you're much in the public spotlight. what's your thoughts on this? >> i think that -- i agree with you. you cannot choose to be obese. you don't choose to be anorexic. it just seems to be that, yes, people would think. you probably sit at home and you eat tons of food. or you sit at home and don't eat anything at all. that's a choice. it's beyond that. >> not just in the news media, emme. let's take chris christie as an example of a figure who has been very publicly criticized, frankly, about his figure, his weight. >> yes. >> the governor is very overweight. he knows it. he admits it. he's addressed this issue time and again. even discussing it with cnn's piers morgan. >> the thing i'm -- my weight. i know it would be better for my kids if i got it more under control. and so, i do feel a sense of guilt, at times, about that. >> okay. isn't he saying the same thing that this guy
. the process done in a petri dish is growth factors that mimics the environment. it is not always a precise science. >> you know, my weekends sometimes would hinge on whether i came in and sold beating cells or not. >> wons they had enough of the beating cells they began watching them as they grew and developed painstakingly extracting their dna and cataloging the genetic changes, a process made possible only by the development of powerful new gene sequencing technology. >> the human genome that was announced cost $3 billion to sequence one individual's dna. and now we can do the same person's dna in a week for $3,000. >> still it took massive networks of computers to organize the data into a color coded genetic blueprint detailing the creation of a heart cell. while having a genetic heart cell macon jury them up, they may be repairing them or heading off birth defects in babies before they are even born. >> we potentially could. part of the attraction to understanding this blueprint, especially this type of blueprint is that it is very aminable -- amenable. >> they hope to study the dna of
and the environment. we're america's natural gas. chances are, you're not made of money, so don't overpay for motorcycle insurance. geico, see how much you could save. by the armful? by the barrelful? the carful? how about...by the bowlful? campbell's soups give you nutrition, energy, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. throughout our lives. one a day women's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for women's health concerns as we age. it has more of 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day 50+. >>shepard: the venezuela leader who called george w. bush the devil and suggested the united states gave his latin america counterparts cancer has won another term. a third term for the president chavez who clutched a copy of the sword of bolivar, a famous dictator in the mid-10000's. thousands commanded "viva chavez." a long time american critic won by a ten-point margin compared by 27 points in 2006 when he was accuses using the oil wells to finance the campaign and looking up votes from the poor through generous welfare reform. and now the
for the environment. a report in the journal of apology say factories that make electric cars can admit more toxic waste in conventional factors. scientists say the production phase is a lot more chemicals. the name makes it to the big picture if the power comes from low carbon sources. we would take a break 4: 43 still ahead today will be a big day for the skydiver you see on the screen he is said to attempt to break a world record details on his jump coming up >> today skydivers going to make a free-fall record with nothing but a helmet, a spacesuit and a parachute. >> inside mission control in anticipation raw nerves, intense focus. we get special access as part tossed a technical analyst does his final preparations for a historical journal. >> is pretty exciting. everyone is in place. we have tested all the e mission even the jumpers by the size will be on display. after five years of preparation to test jobs and various delays called time on tuesday morning is at hand. the jumper and austria skydiver will attempt lowest ever free-fall from 120,000 ft. above the earth's surface. free-fall itse
, in this limited fiscal environment, when we're working together with other countries and we're doing bigger and better things, we have to, you know, retire the older technologies and embrace the new ones and we're going there. >> reporter: any one of you have one favorite shuttle memory? favorite shuttle story? memory? that you actually tell publicly? [ laughter ] i knew that was going to to get them. >> well, we both grew two inches taller. didn't quite make it to six foot. i was 5'11" for two weeks but then i came back down to 5'9". >> reporter: they're going to be on the parade route walking with the shuttle the rest of this way or a good portion of the way over to the california science center. what a treat it's been to talk to the three of them this morning. >> no kidding. i feel like you've cover sod many of these shuttle missions that we need to get you one of those blue jump suits as well one of these days. >> reporter: one of these days -- yeah, she says i should have a blue jump suit. you got that right. thanks, randi. >> thank you. and please thank them as well. that was good to
's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management >>. >> heather: an unmanned privately built spacecraft scheduled for the first launch to the international space station tonight. it's a milestone mission to restore nasa's built to travel back and forth to the space station. nearly two dozen people were arrested during an occupy protest in san francisco. a march turned violent as they allegedly through flares and rocks at police. a train colliding with a semi truck loaded with cars in southern california. with more than 200 passengers on board, crews are on the scene mopping up diesel fuel. three people suffered minor injuries. >> gregg: well, an october scare could be coming for the stock market, if you look at history. historically it's been a tough market for wall street. bubbles bursting, who can forget 1987, ouch! and 1929, i remember that was a good year. [ laughter ] >> gregg: the g
in the presidential environment, we're working hard to have those candidates run strong campaigns. there's only so much that a presidential campaign can do in terms of contacting households across the country. if you have a strong legislative candidate -- state, said that, whatever -- they're the ones who knock on the doors. -- state, senate, whatever -- they are the ones who knock on the doors. host: raising money for these candidates? guest: yes, we raise money, we give them services, we train them. you want to run the best possible campaign, so not only do they win, but they maximize turnout. host: what is the core mission like between gopac -- what is the coordination like between gopac and -- guest: we do not coordinate. host: just take a look here for our viewers, green is what you raised, red is what you spent over different cycles. if you look at 2012, the numbers look low compared to 2008. are you having trouble fund- raising because of super pac influence? how is campaign 2012 different than 2008? guest: now fund our organization with donations, as opposed to -- we are spending more this
great in this desperate environment where the intractable problem of our time is job creation. >> how do we do it? >> just because it sounds good, doesn't mean it is great. there are a combination of a number of things that will create jobs over the next few years and the government can do something to help in those areas. one is housing. the government is doing a great deal already keeping the interest rates low with the fed. that is probably the golden lining around the silver cloud. number two, both candidates are very similar on their investment in energy, more energy will create more jobs. one of the biggest job creators around here. clean energy, dirty energy, point is energy is a big area. number three, this is a particularly democratic position and that is an infrastructure bank. that's where the government puts some money in the rest of the money comes from the private sector and they fund things like bridges, high speed rail, taking on the projects. a lot of republicans don't like that because they think that's government directing spending that the free market should direct. b
to bring vocational education back to the schools. we need to start creating an environment in our schools where the child is not on an educational path for college, they are on the path for vocational training and have a chance to have a solid life with education. we need to empower classrooms and redirect some of the dollars out of the administration in the classroom. >> thank you for the question. other than public safety, there is nothing that the state does that is more important than educating our kids. we have made great progress in a recent years. graduation rates are up, test scores are up. but we have a long way to go. 20% of our schools got a great of -- grade of c or lower. there is nothing that can't be fixed if we give parents more choices and the teachers more freedom to teach. i agree with my competitors and say that in addition to the aspect of our road map, that called for greater emphasis on math and reading, i think the time has come when the priority for every high school in indiana again, we lay out a road map. >> thirty second rebuttals. >> any changes will have to
go up to 120,000 feet which is a hostile environment. no matter how much you prepare yourself, you never know how it turns out until you do it for real. >>> just 24 days, 24 days until election day, and your right to vote may be at stake. democrats say republican-controlled state legislatures are on a mission to toughen election laws with the goal of suppressing the democratic vote. in florida, the legislature which is controlled by the gop decided to eliminate the sunday before election day as an early voting day. it's a day known as souls to the po polls when african-americans typically leave church to vote. here's joe johns with a preview of his documentary. joe? >> you want your country back? i want mine back. don't have an election if they don't come. >> reporter: for dennis, the gop primary marks the maiden voyage of the election law he crafted. >> election's all about turnout. so for the primary on tuesday, we're working right now to get around saturday morning. this is the grass roots, precinct walking. we are going right on the street. do you know what the number is? i'll
operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. >>> all right, political topics are huge right now on internet search engines, but it is not often that the search engines themselves become the political story. cnn's athena jones shows us what happens when you search for the wrong word on google. >> reporter: google, yahoo! bing, search engines are a part of modern life. the top searches on google for the vice presidential debate were joe biden, malarkey, and who is winning the debate, but search engines can also raise eyebrows, for instance, when i type completely wrong into the google image's search, i get a lot of photos of mitt romney. >> reporter: google says that it was unintentional, they picked up romney's only description of his 47% remarks. we saw a similar situation on bing. >> for a search engine, they really rely on what is around the image to learn what it is about. if you put words, completely wrong, they think i guess it is relevant for completely wrong. >> reporter: sometimes it is intentional, these are called google-bombs
's an understatement. but you go up and in environment, at least i was fortunately enough to where we believe that it was perfectible. you know, it's very, i think, pretty much acceptable or maybe somewhat today to be critical or almost invariably critical of the country and pointing out what is wrong. there are obviously things wrong. there were obviously things wrong when i grew up in georgia, and that was pointed out. but it was always this unrelying -- underlying bailiff belief we were entitled -- it was the way we grew up. the nones who were immigrants who would explain it to us we were entitled as citizens of the country to be full participates. there was never any doubt that we were inherently equal. it said so in the decoration of independents. there were times later on -- make remarks reciting the not so pleasant remarks and reciting the pledge of allee again or say things i think were -- not be cell phones. [laughter] people can youtube and you it's around forever. i was upset about thing. but i grew up in an environment with people around me who believed that this country could be
of the environments -- i don't know if there is something about the vice presidential debate setting in general but it seems like the older more established seasoned pro gets the bet er of the other one. dick cheney over edwards, and lloyd benson over dan quayle. something about the vice presidential debate is a little better for the older guy. and i thought biden clearly had home court advantage. he was in command. had facts and stories. you want to talk about reagan and tip o'neill, i was there. >> bill: yeah, and he said martha, look i wanted to straighten you out too. i was in the oval office with the joint chiefs when they said this is what they wanted. i was there with the joint chiefs when they said that. >> absolutely. i this -- there were a couple of women i talked to last night who thought he was maybe a little rough with her at that moment. but he was commanded and authoritative, and it's hard to come back from that. if i don't know want to disagree with them, disagree with the joint chiefs of staff. >> bill: and as he said on more than one occasion facts matter. >>
with this focus on budget, education, and the environment. and the white house, he served as director of the office of management meant but-management budget. he helped make america stronger. at the central intelligence agency, he had notable results disrupting and defeating terror networks. as the secretary of defense, he has struck a balance as a forceful advocate for efficiencies while also standing resolute in favor of an adequately funded military. i am pleased to bestow upon him that 2011 award for upstanding american and contributions to the country. secretary panetta. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. thank you so much for this wonderful evening and the chance to enjoy some terrific company and be able to express my deepest gratitude to this organization for all of the great things that it does on behalf of those that serve in our military. my greatest thanks for your kind remarks and leadership. award not so muchar for myself, but on behalf of the men and women in uniform who are putting their lives on the line every night, every day, in order to protect this coun
, because businesses and wall street needs clarity and direction and for some time it's been an environment of uncertainty. it's why you've seen stagnant in the employment numbers. gdp at 1.3%. the fed is keeping the interest rates very low now in order to make sure there's a backdrop for economic growth and expansion. we need fiscal leadership out of washington to basically say which way the economy will go. >> you mentioned wall street, what wall street doesn't like is uncertainty. but does wall street -- i think the traditional thinking is, well, wall street, when a republican is elected, they kind of like that, because they generally view that as being a pro business person in office. and generally a democrat bringing more regulation perhaps, which wall street might not like. is that a fair assumption? >> i would say so, to a certain degree. we need regulation, but not overregulation. if you look at a lot of surveys of the fortune 500 ceos now, a lot of them are saying there's too much regulation and there's more to come down the road with franks. franks will present five new government
for an individual woman is being able to create the kind of environment where she is content. that she believes she's dedicating the time she needs if she has children to those children and to her career. but i do think there is -- there is an importance in having larger numbers at the top because, let's be honest. women leaders are often different. to have a mix of both male and female at the top of a corporation i think is a really important mix. >> mitt romney has said that he plans to propose eliminating funding for pbs. >> i'm going to stop the subsidy to pbs. i'm going to stop other things. i like pbs. i like big bird. >> the national endowment of the arts, should he be elected president of the united states. of course pbs is where sesame street airs for people who watch it domestically. what do you think of the proposal? >> sesame street is a nonprofit organization and also a nonpartisan organization. i don't want to be critical of any camp. the perception that gives is a little bit misleading. because while we we have been on pbs for some 43 years, and we're partners and support i have of i
and the environment. we're america's natural gas. >>> two nfl elite quarterbacks faced off. tom brady led the patriots on more than four scoring drives of more than 80 yards and many called without a huddle. they led by 31-7 in the third quarter. peyton manning through tore two touchdowns but a failed attempt sealed the fate. patriots win 31-21. the former team, the indianapolis colts were wearing chuck strong t-shirts for their heads coach. les than a minuting to, andrew luck connects with wayne and wayne reaching into the end zone and the colts win 30-27. >>> baltimore is back in baseball's playoffs for the first time since 1997 and the yankees spoiled the return last night. the home run ignited a fourth inning and yankees 7, orioles 2, and game two in baltimore. the washington nationals won their first playoff game ever. the two-out single in the eighth scored two runs and they held to to beat st. louis 3-2. gonzalez was wild and gave up seven walks. the nats reliever stymied the cards in the other game last night, the reds beat the giants. >>> the next hour of "cnn newsroom" starts right now. >>>
life exists in extreme environments and the expedition itself reveals how people might live and work on mars if they were studying. that is of interest to the mission planners. so i followed the scientists in the field to understand how the export. it was a big topic at nasa exploration, but we had never even cognitive science in my home disciplined study exploration in the field as people really explore a new landscape. how did they decide where to go and what tools did they use? i documented how they collected and organized samples that they would analyze the instruments in their laboratories back on earth. i studied how the diagrammed and described their work in their notebooks and how this related to their published work. i observed especially how they tended to work alone or in small groups. but observing the scientists of pasadena, i was taken by the incredible contrast the scientists are indoors in a dark room part of a team doing everything by consensus. people from different disciplines are required to work together. geologists who in the arctic would race to the nearest out
to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. jenna: right now new information on a few crime stories we're keeping an eye on for you here on "happening now." a jury trial is set to begin for a vermont woman texting while driving and hurting a pedestrian. she pleaded not guilty to grossly negligent operation of a motor vehicle vehicle. she "florida face to face"s up to 15 years in prison. that is many some of the reason we're watching this case and outcome of it all. >>> an ohio teen is headed to trial charged in a deadly screen to lure victims with phony craig's list job offers. jury selection begins for 17-year-old brogan rafferty. he and another man lured and eventually killed three victims. he faces life
house national security information environment, diplomatic cables, intelligence reporting. a lot of live information comes in. it's the duty of the people on deck there to get it to the national security advisor and chief of staff and it's their job to get it to the president and others. there is no excuse to ignore this information stream and by all accounts including sworn testimony before the congress, accurate information was coming in that has nothing to do with video, it did have something to do with al-qaeda and they said otherwise. >> gregg: the days and weeks ahead we suspect we'll be hear a lot more that will be shocking. thank you very much. >> patti ann: we are awaiting mitt romney's arrival in ohio. he is expected to speak within the hour. we'll bring it to you. ♪ ...reach one customer at a time? whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. >> gregg: hello, everyone. i'm gregg jarrett. welcome to a brander brand-new hour merchandise america's election headquarters. >> patti ann: i'm patti ann. in for heather childers.
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)

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